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TonyMcGartland

Rod and Crank Point Control

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I always quite liked the idea of point control by the wire and crank method. I was hoping to avoid point motors in favour of the manual method. I was wondering if I should take the extra time and effort to run it under the baseboard? I know it can be disguised above or made to look more prototypical.

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I always quite liked the idea of point control by the wire and crank method. I was hoping to avoid point motors in favour of the manual method. I was wondering if I should take the extra time and effort to run it under the baseboard? I know it can be disguised above or made to look more prototypical.

 

I've done it under the baseboard, with a few bits of stick and paper-clips, even linking pairs of points to operate simultaneously.

 

It's worth protecting the outboard ends of the rods from being caught in clothing, etc.

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Bicycle brake cable can be used, which is already in a tube of sorts so can save some time and effort... :)

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Bicycle brake cable can be used, which is already in a tube of sorts so can save some time and effort... :)

 

The model aircraft type of Bowden cables are a bit lower on the friction front and easier to cut to size - I have some pictures somewhere - they've been up on here before, but I'll find them again in a bit.

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The model aircraft type of Bowden cables are a bit lower on the friction front and easier to cut to size - I have some pictures somewhere - they've been up on here before, but I'll find them again in a bit.

 

Here - I've found one - it's not easy to see, but each of the Bowden cables controls a pair of points that operate simultaneously. The 'far' point travels to its extreme movement first, in either direction, and the kinks in the linking wires allow a little more movement in the 'near' points after the 'far' ones have 'made'. The cables came up through the edge of the baseboard to levers with high-friction pivots, to hold the 'near' points in place against the spring of the mechanism. Even with just home-made plywood cranks held in by a wood-screw, they worked almost faultlessly for years. It was only really a lash-up to see if it was worth doing properly, but it didn't seem to need improving, so it was never improved...

 

WDJ06Cn.jpg

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Thats a great idea. All the cables and parts should be easy to get from any decent RC model aero shop (if such exists anymore in ROI after W J Owens closed in bray) :(

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]Thats a great idea. All the cables and parts should be easy to get from any decent RC model aero shop (if such exists anymore in ROI after W J Owens closed in bray)

 

If you look outside Bray , you can go to Dublin where you have Marks Models , Model Shop , Green Hobby & Model , The Radio Control Shop to name but a few .

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Thats a great idea. All the cables and parts should be easy to get from any decent RC model aero shop

 

We only really used the cables because we had them spare and it meant that a lever system could be used to operate them in a 'signal-box' manner. It could, in that case, have also been done with rods, as the wall you see is at the 'back' of the layout and the rods would have run straight to the front.

 

With points that "run across" your line of sight, you don't need a crank for single points, just use the rod direct for push-pull.

 

There were quite a few other rod-operated points around the layout.

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]Thats a great idea. All the cables and parts should be easy to get from any decent RC model aero shop (if such exists anymore in ROI after W J Owens closed in bray)

 

If you look outside Bray , you can go to Dublin where you have Marks Models , Model Shop , Green Hobby & Model , The Radio Control Shop to name but a few .

 

Yes but do any of those sell modelling parts. The Model Shop used to when it was in Bride street a gazillions years ago, but not the last time I popped in, just toy RC stuff.

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On Arigna Town, all the points are operated by wire in tube, Tony and thus far have done 20+ shows without any problems. Mine is narrow bore copper tubing and steel 'piano' wire. As I'd used cork tiles on the baseboard surface, it was easy to cut a channel for the copper tube, which I soldered to countersunk screws set in the baseboard top. The piano wire is bent upwards at the baseboard edge & another short piece of copper tube soldered on to this as a small 'handle'. However, the other methods described about all work just as well.

The only minor problems I've had with this method is [very rarely] the wire can become stiff/tight in the tube. Should this occur, it is a simple matter to replace it with new wire. The only disturbance to the layout is where the wire joins the tie-bar - in my case a piece of copper clad strip, which just needs re-soldering.

Cheap and simple, especially if your points are already self isolating, as no other wiring is needed. Alternatively you can drill a hole in the head of a sliding microswitch and [with suitable bits of small tube either side, use this to both move the points and change polarity at the same time - particularly useful if you use Peco points, where the contacts have never been particularly robust or reliable, in any scale.

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A cheaper a more readily available alternative is curtain wire:

 

4593440_l.jpg

 

You can use this as the tube and guitar strings make a suitable material for the wire controlling the points.

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Hi Noel I do believe I have bout hundred lengths of Bowden tube and inserts that accepts rc pushrods tube is bout a metre long and also the saddles that facilitate the tube been screwed to baseboard and the breakthrough inserts that clean up the look on the base boards.I use this stuff in all my rc models

I'll have a look tomorrow and take some pics and get them up , oh and I've also got bellcranks and 4 to 8 inch pushrods that can be cut to suit.

Peadair...

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Hi Noel I do believe I have bout hundred lengths of Bowden tube and inserts that accepts rc pushrods tube is bout a metre long and also the saddles that facilitate the tube been screwed to baseboard and the breakthrough inserts that clean up the look on the base boards.I use this stuff in all my rc models

I'll have a look tomorrow and take some pics and get them up , oh and I've also got bellcranks and 4 to 8 inch pushrods that can be cut to suit.

Peadair...

 

So tell me this were you a Futaba, Skyleader or Multiplex user? :)

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The only minor problems I've had with this method is [very rarely] the wire can become stiff/tight in the tube. Should this occur, it is a simple matter to replace it with new wire.

 

The ones in my picture on the first page are 'tube-in-tube', this puts an end to unravelling woes.

 

I once changed the clutch on my first motorbike, only to find the the wire had frayed inside the casing and was not allowing the release bearing to release properly...

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For Cynwyd/Llangollen in N gauge and Shunters Yard in OO gauge, I have used simple push-pull arrangements which are operable from the from and/or back of the layout. The guide tubes are small diameter rawl plug lengths with brass wire to actuate the points. The screw linkages have an L-shaped wire which fits through the base board and through the point rocker bar.

 

DSCF1363.jpg

DSCF1361.jpg

DSCF1362.jpg

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I was a skyleader (that does bring back some memories) and still am a futaba man with several systems that I use today of j10's and 6's and a couple of other generics cos I fly a 550 flame drone, windbag,helicopter plus 2 jetfoils (nicknamed 'tinfoil in Ireland')HMS Speedy, and CU-na-Mara, couple hovercraft, couple lifeboats,Perkasa gunboat, and others all large scale models from 4ft through 5ft and I make all my own fibreglass mouldings and castings and design electromechanics and lots more ! But I digress , when it comes to trains I need the expertise of you guys as I'm a learner and look forward and am grateful for any help given.

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Posted (edited)

Screen Shot 2017-01-09 at 23.55.06.png

 

When using rod and crank point control I presume its best to connect to the pre-drill a hole in the centre of the tie-bar or is there any merit in using a system of cranks on the surface to try to look as realistic as possible and throw the tie-bar from one end only.

Edited by TonyMcGartland

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There is a lot of work in setting up a working point rodding system on a OO gauge mode.

 

Personally I would a wire and tube or push rod system described by David under the baseboard and the Wills cosmetic point rodding above the baseboard. http://www.hattons.co.uk/62545/Wills_Kits_SS89_Point_Rodding_Kit/StockDetail.aspx

 

Thanks for this, I have only 10 points in total?

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Hi Tony I would think that the closer you can get to realism and or scale the better and in terms of rods and cranks that's what I will be doing and fixing the bellcranks onto the boards as per as long as you put a lost motion allowance into the linkage to compensate for over tensioning or straining the linkage so that you always have positive throw. I managed to get some pics of the linkages I use in my workshop so hopefully if I'm clever enough with photo bucket I'll have the pics up today. The other way to do scale bellcranks is if you have a 3D printer or know somebody who has one is to get them knocked up which only takes bout ten minutes once designed on a cad and then scaled down to your exact dimensions and the beauty of 3D is that your able to use the correct colour without the need for painting afterwards but like Manuel of Fawlty Towers (I know Nothing Senior) but then I'm looking forward to learning on here also and I'm preparing to build Drogheda, Platin, and Tara Mines at the end of the garden once the house move is over !

Peadair....:banana::trains:

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Thanks for this, I have only 10 points in total?

 

There have been a few attempts at near scale working point rodding , notably amongst P4 enthusiasts, ( if you have access to their Forum, there is a useful debate ) . Personally , its way to finicky to get both operational and scale aspects of it right.

 

dummy rodding on top, working wire in tube or rod operation below in my view

 

dave

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Are the commercial rod and crank point rodding systems available actually to scale?

 

Think the scale ones are cosmetic lineside scenery that doesn't actually function

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