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Thread: MGWR/GSR K1/K1a class (Woolwich Moguls)

  1. #11
    Senior Member DiveController's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noel View Post
    Any chance of a pair of photos side by side of UK one and an Irish one for comparison?
    Best I can do for now
    https://mikemorant.smugmug.com/Train...1953/i-FwGWzjJ

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike 84C View Post
    The British N class had both types of Maunsell tender. They were also left and right hand drive but I believe the CIE ones were all right hand drive as all the photos I have seen show the exhaust injector by the left hand cab steps. And the reversing reach rod on the right.
    So they were driven from the right for left hand running? I believe there was a later batch that was left hand drive also?
    "Where Seventeen Railroads Meet the Sea"

  2. #12
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    Morning DC, Good photograph I think it makes my point. I did a repaint of a BR N into a CIE K a couple of years ago but when I look at pictures of K class now, I can see that I should have put rivets on the smoke box and more effort into a different smoke box door. Its "face" spoils the loco for me.
    Only ex GWR locos were all right hand drive for left hand running. All the other companies had a mixture of LH/RH drive locos, in my experience. But the GWR always was different!

  3. #13
    Seeing that the K1's had a riveted smoke box, it makes me wonder just what was in the kits of parts the GSR got. I read somewhere that the Southern version all had welded smoke boxes so why where they not included in the GSR kits, was it down to the lack of Steel and a cheaper deal was done just to take the parts off the Hands of the UK government at the time? or more cynically on my part was it just a stitch up by the British Government at the time to get rid of a number of part build locos? Either way I think the GSR had the last laugh.

    Getting back into this thread has made me realise I have two white metal kits to build, so I will have to build one of each type now.

  4. #14
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    In Locomotives of the GSR on pages 247,248,249 there are photos of Irish K class with the welded smoke box and the domed smoke box door. According to the potted history the MGW did a very good deal with an average purchase price per set of parts of 2,200 per engine and the Woolwich Arsenal had paid 3,375 average per boiler 3/4 yrs earlier. Cheap as chips hence the nickname Woolworths.

  5. #15
    Hi folks,

    I've split this conversation from the thread in the 'for sale' section. Can I respectfully remind you all not to derail (pun intended) such threads with tangential discussion. Thanks!

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  6. #16
    Senior Member Horsetan's Avatar
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    Some additional notes:

    Original K1 and K1a smokeboxes weren't so much welded as flush-riveted. That is to say that, once applied, the rivet heads were blended into the sheet metal of the smokebox. They would not show in photos.

    Once the GSR/CIE overhaul scheme was underway and the smokeboxes fell to be replaced, standard practice was to use snaphead rivets whose domed heads were clearly visible. They were somewhat cheaper in terms of labour costs to use. The Maunsell door was also replaced by the GSR style (similar to the SECR Wainwright type which was part-domed, part-flush) with a wheel-and-handle.

    The Irish engines also had a wider overall width over their footplates: I forget if it was 8'9".

    Both K1/K1a shared the same 7'3"X 8'3" wheelbase, as did the British "N", but the 6' wheeled "U" had its own 7'3" X 7'9".

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