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Thread: Irish Rail Mark3's

  1. #21
    Senior Member DiveController's Avatar
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    They're not that easy to respray accurately with the silver framing around each window. Most resprayers want to respray only from the BR IC coaches masking the centre area but the color in that area on those coaches is more of a charcoal IMO rather than black. Yes, there are silver decals available for the windows. Still leave the doors...
    "Where Seventeen Railroads Meet the Sea"

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Noel View Post
    Hi Rich



    Combination of reasons. Lack of compatible RTR rolling stock, the Lima effect, and yes IMHO, shorter wheel base stock will have a broader appeal and wider target market. Another reason may be the 201 prototypes may not have as much nostalgia appeal as the earlier GMs due to the predominant age profile of the hobby, and the very distinctive shape of the older locos with walkways and rails just makes the models more desirable than the plain shape of the modern locos.



    That makes a lot of sense re PP where shorter rakes won't look out of place. In IE 121 hauling two or three coaches and a DVT would fit in well on any size layout.

    I travelled more miles myself on mk2 and mk3 but bizarrely my 'nostalgia' memory prefers the look, operating fun and great diversity of older stock when playing model trains, but that's just a personal thing. I actually have a 201 but its more for a display case and don't plan to drive it on the layout.
    Lack of compatible rtr rolling stock ?
    Name:  201 galway set.jpg
Views: 204
Size:  101.5 KB

    They also worked Craven trains on a regular basis. SSM Ammonia wagons, SSM 42ft flats, and the list goes on. I would bet correct detailed accurate MK111 coaches would sell like hot cakes, the beautiful Supertrain livery and branding that Dive linked, IR & IE liveries. They would cover a greater period than the newer and more recent Dublin Heuston to Cork coaches.

    As always Noel like all of us you are entitled to your opinion and correct to voice it, even if it is a wee bit ill informed at times.

    Rich,

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by RedRich View Post
    Lack of compatible rtr rolling stock ?
    Name:  201 galway set.jpg
Views: 204
Size:  101.5 KB

    They also worked Craven trains on a regular basis. SSM Ammonia wagons, SSM 42ft flats, and the list goes on. I would bet correct detailed accurate MK111 coaches would sell like hot cakes, the beautiful Supertrain livery and branding that Dive linked, IR & IE liveries. They would cover a greater period than the newer and more recent Dublin Heuston to Cork coaches.

    As always Noel like all of us you are entitled to your opinion and correct to voice it, even if it is a wee bit ill informed at times.

    Rich,
    No prob Rich. Like that photo, is that a mixed rake of mk2 and cravens, or Galway mk2 set with some black roofed mk2? Personally for me 201s were more quintessentially remembered for hauling mk3 sets and later the mk4, but perhaps that memory is shaped by the routes I travelled on most. As you say 'each on to their own'.

  4. #24
    Senior Member jhb171achill's Avatar
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    All Mk. 2.

    Cravens couldn't run with Mk 2 (or 3) in passenger traffic.

    I have to say that I saw a random mix of "Galway" liveried Mk 2s and "tippex" ones - more often than the much more uniform set shown above! Good to see them all in a row, as it were - a lovely photo.
    “An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it. Truth stands, even if there be no public support”

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  5. #25
    The MK11's were retired from the Dublin Heuston - Waterford and the return journey by the MK111 push pulls and they were very often pulled by a 201. The coaches in the pic are as JB has pointed out all MK11 aircons. I remember seeing the full Galway set in Heuston a week after it had been returned to traffic. There were nine coaches in all refurbished outside and inside, There weren't any composites refurbished for it. Getting back to the MK111's they are the most comfortable coaches I have ever traveled on in Ireland. We'll see how the Oxford models look in the flesh, hopefully they will raise the bar, and if there is a chance they might make amendments to their tooling we might see a proper MK111 set of coaches in the future.

    Rich,

  6. #26
    Senior Member DiveController's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhb171achill View Post
    All Mk. 2.

    Cravens couldn't run with Mk 2 (or 3) in passenger traffic.
    True. Many unusual pairings of locos or coaches were top rescue failed trains of simply as stock transfers
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/metrov...-xX3W4F-wZxRPt
    The first coach in that train seems to be a first/composite
    "Where Seventeen Railroads Meet the Sea"

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by DiveController View Post
    True. Many unusual pairings of locos or coaches were top rescue failed trains of simply as stock transfers
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/metrov...-xX3W4F-wZxRPt
    The first coach in that train seems to be a first/composite
    First coach is a standard Craven. Second is the Mark 2 EGV. Rest are standard Mark 2's bar the 4th vehicle (54xx buffet) the second last vehicle (appears to be a Mark 2 composite but likely declassified)

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by DiveController View Post
    True. Many unusual pairings of locos or coaches were top rescue failed trains of simply as stock transfers
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/metrov...-xX3W4F-wZxRPt
    The first coach in that train seems to be a first/composite
    I actually worked that particular train from Castlerea to Ballina on that date,
    From my notes in my Guards journel,the Cravens coach is 1558 and it was to replace 1505 which had developed an electrical fault while working the Ballina branch train,
    Sorry for going off topic admins.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by DiveController View Post
    True. Many unusual pairings of locos or coaches were top rescue failed trains of simply as stock transfers
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/metrov...-xX3W4F-wZxRPt
    The first coach in that train seems to be a first/composite
    I actually worked that particular train from Castlerea to Ballina on that date,
    From my notes in my Guards journel,the Cravens coach is 1558 and it was to replace 1505 which had developed an electrical fault while working the Ballina branch train,
    Sorry for going off topic admins.

  10. #30
    Senior Member DiveController's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hurricanemk1c View Post
    First coach is a standard Craven. Second is the Mark 2 EGV. Rest are standard Mark 2's bar the 4th vehicle (54xx buffet) the second last vehicle (appears to be a Mark 2 composite but likely declassified)
    yes. Sorry, that was my fault. I was referring back to Rich's post above without making that clear to, well, anyone else, I suppose
    Quote Originally Posted by RedRich View Post
    Name:  201 galway set.jpg
Views: 204
Size:  101.5 KB
    The first coach in this train seems to be a first/composite. Looks to be only seven vs. the usual 8
    "Where Seventeen Railroads Meet the Sea"

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