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Thread: 1960s train speeds crossing bridges and viaducts

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by jhb171achill View Post
    . . . we probably have the single most interesting and varied period in recent railway history.
    Agree absolutely Jonathan. Engines, carriages and wagons that made train noises. A far cry from todays boring uniform modern image yo-yos. 1950 to 1975 seemed the golden era.

    Quote Originally Posted by roxyguy View Post
    Cheers, very interesting indeed. Will encourage me to make up a few trains with a nice mix of the two, something different. Just a need a few Murphy 121's and I'll be off.

    Me too. I can almost hear the distant rumble of the new Murphy Models 121 class if I put my ear to the rails and listen carefully. Its only a matter of months now. Watching videos like these has convinced me to buy one in the grey livery as well as a few in black'n'tan. As Jonathan says we can run almost any stock mix behind them.

  2. #12
    .

    Simulated nostalgia film



    Apologies, couldn't resist

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Noel View Post
    .

    Simulated nostalgia film



    Apologies, couldn't resist
    Brilliant.

  4. #14
    Senior Member jhb171achill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eiretrains View Post

    The tin luggage van that's tacked onto the rear of the Waterford-Mallow goods......appears to have been a frequent occurrence and I too have wondered for what purpose. I have asked those familiar with the line but I haven't quite got any concrete answer yet.
    I remember seeing that once or twice in the 1960s, but no more. I was told at the time that it was "probably carrying newspapers". Of course, if correct, that may even have simply been a one-off. Certainly, while it did occur, it wasn't common.

    Other trains shown in that vid have a GSWR bogie with a tin van at EACH end. I often wondered about that too, having seen examples elsewhere of trains, sometimes quite short, with a van at either end.

    I recall seeing what would have been one of the last Limerick - Ballina trains consisting of two laminates, with a bogie van at one end and a tin van at the other. I think it was the last time I saw a tin four-wheeler in traffic.
    “An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it. Truth stands, even if there be no public support”

    Never argue with an idiot. He will bring you down to his level, then beat you with experience.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by roxyguy View Post
    Brilliant.
    Glad you liked it. A bit of simulated nostalgia fun for 1960s rural CIE era on old cine film.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Noel View Post
    Glad you liked it. A bit of simulated nostalgia fun for 1960s rural CIE era on old cine film.
    It's OK, but this modern nostalgia's not as good as the old stuff...
    My best work has been spread over many fields..

  7. #17
    Senior Member Mayner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhb171achill View Post
    I remember seeing that once or twice in the 1960s, but no more. I was told at the time that it was "probably carrying newspapers". Of course, if correct, that may even have simply been a one-off. Certainly, while it did occur, it wasn't common.

    Other trains shown in that vid have a GSWR bogie with a tin van at EACH end. I often wondered about that too, having seen examples elsewhere of trains, sometimes quite short, with a van at either end.

    I recall seeing what would have been one of the last Limerick - Ballina trains consisting of two laminates, with a bogie van at one end and a tin van at the other. I think it was the last time I saw a tin four-wheeler in traffic.
    There are several photos of J15 hauled North Wexford passenger trains iin the early 60s in the Irish Railways in Colour series, the usual consist seems to have been a late GSWR corridor coach sandwiched between a pair of 4 w (tarnished silver) luggage vans. The only change seems to the consist seems to have been substituting one of the luggage vans with a heating van when the service was dieselised shorty before closure in 1963. There is also a picture of a North Wexford passenger train made up of a large J9 Class 0-6-0 and a solitary Rosslare 12 w brake comp. This would have had room for 1st and2nd class passengers and mail/parcel traffic.

    The line limit over the North Wexford appears to have been 50 for passengers and 35 for goods trains.

    The passenger services on the Waterford-Mallow line was restricted to a daily Cork-Waterford passenger train and the Cork-Rosslare express appears to have run trice weekly (TTS) for most of the year and daily during the summer peak.


    Although there was no scheduled mail service over the line a luggage van on the goods would have been useful for parcel and newspaper (The Cork Examiner?) traffic on a line with such a sparse passenger service.
    John


    If I was going there I would'nt be starting here.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Broithe View Post
    It's OK, but this modern nostalgia's not as good as the old stuff...
    Nostalgia is not what it used to be...

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