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Thread: NCC Jinty

  1. #11
    NCC Jinty No18 has been spotted a Valencia Harbour,usually in the last hour of a show,Andy.

  2. #12
    Founding Father jhb171achill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Cundick View Post
    NCC Jinty No18 has been spotted a Valencia Harbour,usually in the last hour of a show,Andy.
    Last hour before closing time?
    :-)
    “An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it. Truth stands, even if there be no public support”

    Never argue with an idiot. He will bring you down to his level, then beat you with experience.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by jhb171achill View Post
    Given lottery wins of some magnitude, if a preserved one in Britain was going begging, it could be brought here and regauged - perfect for the DCDR!

    But then, the GNR tank loco in Cultra, or No. 30, would be better........
    I would agree with you but if money was no object why not build a new one in 12 inches to the foot scale, sure would be quicker to get running and to extend the BCDR to a rebuilt station at Ardglass, we can but dream.

  4. #14
    Founding Father jhb171achill's Avatar
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    If a new-build was to be a likelihood, like the RPSI's talk of another Jeep -v- a mogul, practicality would have to not just be more important than emotional preferences, but would have to oblitarate such thoughts.

    In practical terms, the best options for a new build would be just about big enough to take the DCDR's maximum likely load (three to four bogies) over a distance of maybe 6 miles (9km), with least coal consumption.

    We're looking at a Jinty perhaps, a GNR 2.4.2T, a MGWR J26 (ideally; simple reliable machines), or the West Cork "Argadeen" 2.6.0T. Pretty much all else else either would eat too much coal or would be too light (e.g. 90!). 90, of course, or the sugar locos, are perfect for current operation, the shortness of which makes even a Jinty of a J16 an unnecessary extravangance.

    The RPSI's No. 3 "R H Smyth" was also an absolutely ideal locomotive for Downpatrick.
    “An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it. Truth stands, even if there be no public support”

    Never argue with an idiot. He will bring you down to his level, then beat you with experience.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by jhb171achill View Post
    If a new-build was to be a likelihood, like the RPSI's talk of another Jeep -v- a mogul, practicality would have to not just be more important than emotional preferences, but would have to oblitarate such thoughts.

    In practical terms, the best options for a new build would be just about big enough to take the DCDR's maximum likely load (three to four bogies) over a distance of maybe 6 miles (9km), with least coal consumption.

    We're looking at a Jinty perhaps, a GNR 2.4.2T, a MGWR J26 (ideally; simple reliable machines), or the West Cork "Argadeen" 2.6.0T. Pretty much all else else either would eat too much coal or would be too light (e.g. 90!). 90, of course, or the sugar locos, are perfect for current operation, the shortness of which makes even a Jinty of a J16 an unnecessary extravangance.

    The RPSI's No. 3 "R H Smyth" was also an absolutely ideal locomotive for Downpatrick.

    I totally agree with you, a new build loco has to be of use and as much as we would like to have everything that has ever operated, a heritage railway places a different kind of restrain on what locos you need. Should it come to pass and that Downpatrick was able to rebuild back to Ardglass and or just to the outside of Newcastle, then the sort of locos you need will be much different to those you have now.

    I do not know the trackbed on the BCDR and what operational problems may exist, so I am hesitant to suggest a type of loco that might be nice to have but totally unsuitable for the heritage operation. If a new loco was required then why not look at one of the old BCDR 4-4-2T designs? as it must have been suitable for the operations back then so it should be OK now.

    Of course we still have the old SL&NCR 0-6-4T which as far as I am aware has never worked since it was taken into preservation, could this be a suitable candidate to be restored for future BCDR operations?

  6. #16
    Founding Father jhb171achill's Avatar
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    You're absolutely right, Colin.

    "Lough Erne" and, appropriately, BCDR No. 30, would be operationally suitable, but would eat more than a smaller loco, and would thus be uneconomic on all but the St Pats & Santa trains. A Jinty or J26 would be better, if available.

    There is one very severe gradient in the cutting just south of Downpatrick - in fact, short as it is, one of Ireland's most severe, as the line south of DP was very cheaply built. However, given a decent run, its shortness is such that even a Sugar loco can get three bogies over it.
    “An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it. Truth stands, even if there be no public support”

    Never argue with an idiot. He will bring you down to his level, then beat you with experience.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by jhb171achill View Post
    . . .and would thus be uneconomic on all but the St Pats & Santa trains. A Jinty or J26 would be better, if available.
    Hi JB. Please forgive my total ignorance, but could boilers in steam locos be heated with oil/kero rather than coal? Cleaner and less expensive if they can get high enough temps? Running for cover now. Noel

    http://www.greatwestern.org.uk/m_in_gwr_oil_fire.htm
    Last edited by Noel; 1 Week Ago at 10:15 AM.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Noel View Post
    Hi JB. Please forgive my total ignorance, but could boilers in steam locos be heated with oil/kero rather than coal? Cleaner and less expensive if they can get high enough temps? Running for cover now. Noel

    http://www.greatwestern.org.uk/m_in_gwr_oil_fire.htm
    Hi Noel

    That was the case of the Festiniog Railway a few years ago and I think some of them still run on oil, however the big problem is that in order to use oil to burn, it heats up the firebox too quickly and cause cracks in the corners and other such mechanical problems, this is what I have been told by those who play with these things on a regular basis.

    There are of course solutions to any problem and the web is full of them, if you have the time to find them and you are in the mood, why not try the 5AT website http://www.5at.co.uk/

    You may have gather by now I am a bit of a magpie when it come to finding info on the web, I don't believe in redesign the wheel when one already exists.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Noel View Post
    Hi JB. Please forgive my total ignorance, but could boilers in steam locos be heated with oil/kero rather than coal? Cleaner and less expensive if they can get high enough temps? Running for cover now. Noel

    http://www.greatwestern.org.uk/m_in_gwr_oil_fire.htm
    CIÉ had 93 oil burning steam locos in 1946/7, but, as coal supplies returned to normal after the war, the scheme was dropped - with a short resumption in 1954.
    My best work has been spread over many fields..

  10. #20
    Super Guru Mayner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noel View Post
    Hi JB. Please forgive my total ignorance, but could boilers in steam locos be heated with oil/kero rather than coal? Cleaner and less expensive if they can get high enough temps? Running for cover now. Noel

    http://www.greatwestern.org.uk/m_in_gwr_oil_fire.htm

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NrLzhPbbtiY

    Oil firing tends to work best in locos designed for oil firing, not sure its cleaner than coal from an environmental perspective.

    Like the GWR CIE converted many locos to oil firing during the 1947 coal shortage, but abandoned oil firing once coal became readily available. One of the problems was excessive boiler/firebox wear on old locos due to a combination of deferred maintenance during the Emergency and the greater stresses from oil firing.

    The Festiniog fired their locos for many years on waste oil, and more recently diesel before returning to coal firing
    John


    If I was going there I would'nt be starting here.

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