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  1. #21
    Anyone ever see a certificate like this before.....

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  2. #22
    Senior Member jhb171achill's Avatar
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    jhb171 Senior had an identical one! He would have joined the PWI about 1944. When he died two years ago, he was the oldest member of it in Ireland, and the last from the GNR(I) or NCC, as far as anyone was then aware, and also the last surviving GSR white-collar staff member, also as far as anyone knew. (He worked for all 3 companies, as well as the UTA and the LMS in England).
    “An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it. Truth stands, even if there be no public support”

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  3. #23
    I'm sure they were acquainted

  4. #24
    Senior Member jhb171achill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TonyMcGartland View Post
    I'm sure they were acquainted
    Bound to have been, Tony! A very different world that they lived in!
    “An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it. Truth stands, even if there be no public support”

    Never argue with an idiot. He will bring you down to his level, then beat you with experience.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Glenderg View Post

    Though I did spot this recently.. Dubious vintage apparently

    Attachment 26634
    That is the real thing, that was attached to the cabin up until 5 years or so ago.
    GSR/CIE bilingual signs weren't always enamelled, a few were simply painted onto sheet steel.
    Probably better off indoors before the paint fades any further or peels off.

  6. #26
    Senior Member jhb171achill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by minister_for_hardship View Post
    That is the real thing, that was attached to the cabin up until 5 years or so ago.
    GSR/CIE bilingual signs weren't always enamelled, a few were simply painted onto sheet steel.
    Probably better off indoors before the paint fades any further or peels off.
    Yes indeed - it is the real deal. And again, I would recommend keeping it indoors.
    “An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it. Truth stands, even if there be no public support”

    Never argue with an idiot. He will bring you down to his level, then beat you with experience.

  7. #27
    Anyone what this is from?
    Heavy piece of kit





    Non Railway but just liked it, Road Traffic Act 1933, vehicle plate, might be from a horse drawn yoke?


    [/QUOTE]

    SWL plate, probably from one of those hand cranked cranes that used be on loading banks.
    EDIT 4 1/2 T might be a bit much for those, perhaps a small travelling crane.

    Second one, could be bus or truck.
    No way of knowing unless you trawl the records with the number.
    Last edited by minister_for_hardship; 31-01-2017 at 02:48 PM.

  8. #28
    Senior Member jhb171achill's Avatar
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    The second one....I think the top bit reads "Road Transport Act 1933" - am I right? And the lower bit means "licence plate". Thus, it is off a commercial (privately owned) registered lorry. It must be remembered that at that time the GSR had almost a monopoly of road freight. I am not sure if ownership records are still held for that period - if they are, bear in mind that the vehicle could have had many owners in its lifetime.

    Actually - just thinking - since the GSR was a private commercial company, rather than a state or nationalised entity, it could in theory be off a GSR lorry.
    “An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it. Truth stands, even if there be no public support”

    Never argue with an idiot. He will bring you down to his level, then beat you with experience.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by jhb171achill View Post
    The second one....I think the top bit reads "Road Transport Act 1933" - am I right? And the lower bit means "licence plate". Thus, it is off a commercial (privately owned) registered lorry. It must be remembered that at that time the GSR had almost a monopoly of road freight. I am not sure if ownership records are still held for that period - if they are, bear in mind that the vehicle could have had many owners in its lifetime.

    Actually - just thinking - since the GSR was a private commercial company, rather than a state or nationalised entity, it could in theory be off a GSR lorry.
    The lower bit says 'vehicle plate'.

    The modern version of this now carried by private buses is an oval alloy plate with just 'Public Service Vehicle' in Irish and an ID number usually fixed up front inside the bus. I have one somewhere with the reg numbers of previous buses that carried it scratched into the backside of it, so as well as going through several owners the plate could have been carried by more than one vehicle. I believe CIE buses had to carry them at one point but not any more.

    CIE Conductors used wear an oval badge headed 'F.S.P.' (Public Service Vehicle abbreviated in Irish), a central number and 'Fear Stiurtha' (lit. Steering Man, not to be confused with Driver 'Tiomanai') underneath from a time when it couldn't be imagined there would be such a thing as a female bus conductor. Can be seen here worn by Albert Finney in A Man Of No Importance.

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    Last edited by minister_for_hardship; 01-02-2017 at 10:14 AM.

  10. #30

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