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Thread: GNR(i) Wagons

  1. #11
    Senior Member DiveController's Avatar
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    Did vans actually transport Guinness or grain for the manufacturing process ... or began life in a different role and then transitioned to conveying the black stuff itself?
    Nice photos, Tony. Always interesting to see old rolling stock
    "Where Seventeen Railroads Meet the Sea"

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by DiveController View Post
    Did vans actually transport Guinness or grain for the manufacturing process ... or began life in a different role and then transitioned to conveying the black stuff itself?
    Nice photos, Tony. Always interesting to see old rolling stock
    According to the drawing I have, five 'Guinness' wagons were converted to 'loose grain wagons' in 1938. Two of these were converted back for 'ordinary' traffic in 1942, one of which was 2518, the second wagon at Whitehead. This description would suggest the vans could have been originally used for transporting the black stuff, but more likely for transporting bagged grain.
    The drawing also shows three roof hatches, presumably for loading loose grain, and hopper like sloping floors inside, for discharging the grain via chutes attached to the fixtures on the sides, four on one side and two on the other, as shown in the photos.
    As 504 has opening doors on one side only in the pictures, it must have ceased to be used as a loose grain wagon later in life as it is not one of the two 1942 reconversions. The drawing shows a ladder on both sides, with an internal ladder leading down from the centre roof hatch.

  3. #13
    Senior Member DiveController's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TonyMcGartland View Post
    That's seems like very reliable information , David. You can just make out the front and middle roof hatches on the photo. The doors look like a pretty flimsy modification.

    Quote Originally Posted by TonyMcGartland View Post
    I had noticed the hatches on the sides. Seems like the wagon would have appeared like this with ladders on both sides initially. Certainly the 'GN' is on the 2 and 5th panels on each side with 'Guinness' (in a different font/size/position) applied with the addition of the doors.


    Would the grain have been discharged into bags or some sort of light truck or more like a trackside hopper on elevated track?
    Not a bad little wagon and very different from hopper styled wagons in more recent times.
    Last edited by DiveController; 03-01-2017 at 09:58 PM.
    "Where Seventeen Railroads Meet the Sea"

  4. #14
    Senior Member Mayner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiveController View Post
    That's seems like very reliable information , David. You can just make out the front and middle roof hatches on the photo. The doors look like a pretty flimsy modification.



    Would the grain have been discharged into bags or some sort of light truck or more like a trackside hopper on elevated track?
    Not a bad little wagon and very different from hopper styled wagons in more recent times.
    There is a photo in one of the Ian Allen Irish Railway Pictorial Albums of one of these wagons discharging grain from an elevated siding into a large bulk grain truck in Omagh goods yard.

    Difficult to describe the siding appears to be supported by a massive retaining wall that allowed trucks to draw alongside to load, which helps explain the side chutes rather than the more common bottom doors used with grain wagons

    Perhaps Tony may have a photo of this part of the yard.
    John


    If I was going there I would'nt be starting here.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Mayner View Post
    There is a photo in one of the Ian Allen Irish Railway Pictorial Albums of one of these wagons discharging grain from an elevated siding into a large bulk grain truck in Omagh goods yard.

    Difficult to describe the siding appears to be supported by a massive retaining wall that allowed trucks to draw alongside to load, which helps explain the side chutes rather than the more common bottom doors used with grain wagons

    Perhaps Tony may have a photo of this part of the yard.
    Although I have photographs of the Goods Yard I have nothing to show the shutes in operation from the yard above. The retaining wall, as you describe it, still exists today and shutes were used from the grain store above to fill the wagons below. This all changed when the UTA took over and the grain store became a yard for the UTA and was full of parked buses.

  6. #16
    Senior Member DiveController's Avatar
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    Very interesting. Thanks, John and Tony for posting. If anyone knows the exact reference John is referring to, could you please post? Thanks
    "Where Seventeen Railroads Meet the Sea"

  7. #17
    Here is a picture I found in my library, cannot remember the source. This shows the Goods Yard, post UTA with the grain store on a higher level now being used for their buses. The siding to the left was used originally for grain and the shutes are no longer visible.Name:  GNR022.jpg
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  8. #18
    Senior Member DiveController's Avatar
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    THat's a very interesting photos which just oozes athmosphere. The grain van you posted would have been loaded from the store through the three roof vents. It seems there was also an elevated siding for unloading grain according to Mayner.
    "Where Seventeen Railroads Meet the Sea"

  9. #19
    I was told the shuts were hung down the outside of the high retaining wall and placed into wagons, maybe I'm wrong. However, the last shunter who worked Omagh, Joe McGrew is a good friend of mine and I see him quite a lot. I was thinking of interviewing him on camera on his memories of the shunting operations at Omagh and for some knowledge on the make up of the wagons he worked.

  10. #20
    Senior Member DiveController's Avatar
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    I'm sure that's correct, Tony. I don't know enough of the grain industry to have an insight into the workings. While there are only two distilleries that I am aware of in Ireland, there would have been a score of them in the last century. I'm not sure if the grain was destined for the bakeries locally, adjacent towns or "for a more divine purpose"

    Quote Originally Posted by TonyMcGartland View Post
    However, the last shunter who worked Omagh, Joe McGrew is a good friend of mine and I see him quite a lot. I was thinking of interviewing him on camera on his memories of the shunting operations at Omagh and for some knowledge on the make up of the wagons he worked.
    I enjoy these types of interviews which are invaluable as times continues to pass
    Last edited by DiveController; 06-01-2017 at 06:13 AM.
    "Where Seventeen Railroads Meet the Sea"

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