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Thread: David's Workbench

  1. #351
    Quote Originally Posted by Weshty View Post
    Wonderful work as always David, and you make it look so effortless. Congrats.
    +1

    Absolutely class. Really enjoy your posts David. Noel

  2. #352
    Senior Member Mayner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by murrayec View Post
    Hey

    ....he could be stooped over a live steam loco model doing repairs, with lads in caps admiring the link rods!

    Eoin
    Apparently the CVR General Manager and some of the Aughnacloy Works staff built a scale model of a Caledonian 4-4-0 in the evenings after work
    John


    If I was going there I would'nt be starting here.

  3. #353
    Brick work tedious as you say but worth it.

  4. #354
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    Superb buildings-well worth all the effort of scribeing the bricks-great stuff.

  5. #355
    Wow. Brilliant buildings

  6. #356
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    Using DAS clay

    Several people have asked me about using DAS clay, so here are a couple of posts on what I do. However, I must point out that this is all taken from Gordon Gravett's books, particularly 'Building a Layout in 7mm Scale' [Wild Swan]. For those of you who have not come across DAS before, the first picture shows a pack. It comes in both grey and terra cotta colours and is an air drying clay which also contains a proportion of shredded paper. Once opened, keep the pack well sealed and it will last for months.
    I smear the DAS in pea sized balls on to a frame made of foam board. Use PVA/Resin W to stick the foam board together, but use dress making pins to hold while it dries. Coat both sides of the area to be covered in DAS with PVA, or walls might warp. The DAS should be spread to around 1mm thick and will dry overnight. If you get any cracks, they can easily be covered over with further additions.
    The next post will show how I did the chimney.

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    Whither atrophy?

  7. #357
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    More DASing about

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    The photos show things in reverse order. The first is the final bit, using a damp cotton bud to remove excess mortar colour from the surface of the bricks. This is water colour, which is washed on top of the acrylic brick colour [burnt sienna in this case], once the latter is dry.
    Before that, the chimney stack had been built up using pieces of foam board, fitted into the ridge of the roof. A thin coat of PVA goes on, then the DAS is smeared all over, including the top. The latter will give the impression of cement rendering around the bases of the chimney pots. Once the DAS had dried [leaving overnight is best], the surface can be scored with a scriber of choice to give the brick [or stone] courses. I find it helps to have an old toothbrush handy to scrub away the dust made by the scribing. It is also useful to arrange to have a light source coming in from one side, that way, the scribed lines show up better. For brick courses, I scribe horizontal lines a scale 3" apart, with vertical line 9" apart for brick faces. The final picture is a close up of the upper storey of the station building, scribed and painted as above. Tedious, though not as bad as might first appear. Indeed, the hardest part was actually getting started.
    One big advantage of this method is you can accurately make brick courses go round the corners of buildings. Not recommended below 7mm scale though...
    Whither atrophy?

  8. #358
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    Clogher Valley Wagon Drawings

    A couple of folk have asked me about these, so have attached photos of ones I made using dimensions & photos in the Patterson book. High tech they ain't, but hopefully of some use. To 7mm scale, I've included a 'rule' to help with re-sizing if you want 4mm. At least by going smaller, any errors are reduced accordingly!Name:  DSCN2433.jpg
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    Whither atrophy?

  9. #359
    Senior Member jhb171achill's Avatar
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    Another truly outstanding bit of work!

    SLNCR, then CVR, whither next?

    Carndonagh......Blessington.......Courtmacsherry.. .....Fenit........Killaloe.......Ardglass pier....?
    “An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it. Truth stands, even if there be no public support”

    Never argue with an idiot. He will bring you down to his level, then beat you with experience.

  10. #360
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    The idea of doing Blacksod Bay is something I've always fancied JB, or at least ever since I got Rails to Achill...
    A blend of Courtmacsherry and Burton port maybe. One day!

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