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Thread: Irish Bufferstops

  1. #1

    Irish Bufferstops

    I love buffers

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/kilmac/...l-1143838@N21/

    Would like to open a chat on the various options available for modellers - from 'RTP' (ready to plonk) to white metal kits, brass etchings, resin castings - that represent irish or irish-able buffers in all their glory

  2. #2
    Example of the concrete block type http://eiretrains.com/Photo_Gallery/...015_CC_JA.html

    (probably easy enough to bash?)
    Last edited by BosKonay; 12-01-2013 at 09:14 PM.

  3. #3
    one from Ballybrophy
    Name:  kgFzH.jpg
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  4. #4
    News one in Heuston
    Name:  DSC07961.jpg
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  5. #5
    Senior Member jhb171achill's Avatar
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    Those big concrete ones were mass produced by the GSR and are to seen all over the former GSR system - easy to make! In a rural setting, cover them with ivy, in an urban one, graffiti!

  6. #6
    The look easy enough to mould! Then glue a sleeper to the front!

  7. #7
    Old and new on the Nenagh platform at Ballybrophy.



    My best work has been spread over many fields..

  8. #8
    Lovely collection there lads...

  9. #9
    Does anyone know what the small metal clamps behind the modern buffers are? I assume from their appearance and location they are designed to 'brake' the buffer should it ever get hit and move?
    Don't suppose anyone makes a whitemetal or something version?

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by BosKonay View Post
    Does anyone know what the small metal clamps behind the modern buffers are? I assume from their appearance and location they are designed to 'brake' the buffer should it ever get hit and move?
    Don't suppose anyone makes a whitemetal or something version?
    Just that. They are a sort of additive brake. The buffer stop is merely clamped to the rail such that it will slide, if hit hard enough, but there is quite a bit of friction involved, due to the clamp blocks. If the clamps on the stop itself don't have enough friction to halt the progress, then, the whole assembly will start to slide on the rails. It will then successively 'collect' each pair of additional brakes, thus adding to the friction available in a series of steps, and thus providing a very high braking force when it becomes needed, but not applying such a high force for a smaller impact.

    To some extent, though, it does rely on those fish-plate bolts surviving the additional force pulling the rails apart, too. That may be why there's a bit of additional ballast - to support each sleeper sideways...

    Note:- Always check the time of arrival of the next train from Nenagh before using the gents' at Ballybrophy!!


    Those new stops at Heuston are bolted through the rails - you're on your own if you hit them. I suppose that, where they are, there is very little likelihood of them being hit at any real speed - or with passengers aboard..?
    Last edited by Broithe; 13-01-2013 at 10:35 AM.
    My best work has been spread over many fields..

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