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Thread: GSR / CIE Wagon Liveries

  1. #11
    Thanks for the information, Richie those photographs are excellent, I've spent the last 40 mins lost in a wonderful world.

  2. #12
    Senior Member jhb171achill's Avatar
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    Re the date CIE moved from grey to brown.... having studied many hundreds, even thousands, of photos from the 1970s, and with my own observations in mind, I would say that in the 1970 - 78 period, approximately 65% of wagons were brown, the rest still grey. Obviously, more grey about 1972, say; and more brown a few years later.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Mayner's Avatar
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    A good example of a weathered wagon, I caught this gem in Mullingar about 30 years ago. These were basically the standard Irish open wagon for about 40 years from about 1915 up to the introduction of the Bulleid opens in the mid 1950s.

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    John


    If I was going there I would'nt be starting here.

  4. #14
    Senior Member jhb171achill's Avatar
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    Excellent, Mayner! Did u catch its number? On that side it's been obliterated....

  5. #15
    Outline of an oval plate it had once on LHS, must have been a GS&WR wagon.

    What is the faded lettering 'To run between Inchicore & Fairview(?) ________

  6. #16
    Senior Member jhb171achill's Avatar
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    The positioning of the plate is interesting, Minister. Normally, the GSW / GS / CIE tended to put them in the middle - though certainly not always. There is also no "ring" or mark of one - common to most GSW goods stock, this would have been an oval cast iron ring carrying the inscription "TO CARRY (whatever) TONS". This would have been on the body side - though, again, with replacement of planks over the ages, that might have gone. Could the missing plate have read something like "Hurst Nelson...etc"? Certainly, Inchicore farmed out loco and coachin g stock building to British firms from time to time. I am not sure if it did with wagons.

    A nice example in the photo though, and just as necessary as "H" vans or corrugated opens for any layout up to the mid 70s.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Mayner's Avatar
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    The plot thickens I have a LGRP 1930s photo of a similar wagon 10567 with the number plate in the same position as the Mullingar wagon. It could be one of a batch of wagons ordered by from Metropolitan in 1920, the GSWR supplied of these 20 wagons at cost price to the CBSCR.


    The Mullingar wagon may have been used for transporting railcar parts between Fairview and Inchacore, the wagon in the LGRP has an interesting load a pair of steam locomotive wheelsets.
    John


    If I was going there I would'nt be starting here.

  8. #18
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    This is seriously useful stuff - thank you.
    Humbrol is indeed still available [owned by Hornby now] and 64 is the colour for wagon grey and 133 for brown [bauxite], though the latter is a satin finish.
    For quite a while though, I've been using Halford's automotive spray cans. These give a very even finish and their grey & red primers are ideal for wagons, especially in 7mm scale upwards. Add on the usual weathering and it works perfectly well.

  9. #19
    Great article and thanks for all that valuable information! So would CIE also have used the LMS grey and as well, what would the closest British colour to the Red/brown coloured wagons?

  10. #20
    Senior Member jhb171achill's Avatar
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    The grey used by the GSR was as close to LMS grey as anything, though prior to that the GSWR used an extremely dark grey, almost black. CIE continued this shade to the late 50s / early 60s, then used a much lighter shade as shown on that open wagon above and on numerous "H" vans in the 60s and still like that in the 70s.

    The brown used from the late 60s onwards always had a slight reddish tint, though this has been much more marked since the 1990s, as witnessed on Taras, timber wagons and container flats nowadays. In the 70s it was close enough to British Railways wagon brown.

    Again, bear in mind that unlike BR wagons, Irish ones never had black chassis, always body colour; grey for grey wagons, brown for brown ones.

    Exceptions to that rule were Asahi wagons, ammonia tanks, flat sided cement wagons of both types (blue chassis like bodies), bubbles (originally all over grey, then orange with black chassis, finally Irish Cement cream with - eh - cement coloured chassis!, and modern products of Limerick - brown bodies / chassis with black bogies, springs in all sorts of multi colours.

    But for good old 4 wheel stock, see above.

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